Making a Short Film…

I’m not a videographer, my skills don’t really stretch that far. Although I would absolutely love to making videos it’s just not something I feel comfortable getting into, my preference lies in still images. I prefer the much wider creative scope and the power a still image can hold. However, I want to change that.

I’m a huge film fan, my respect for history of cinema and filmmaking in general has grown and grown since I was in 4th year in school where I did a filmmaking course, a film studies class and a history of cinema class. And over the past few months I’ve become more and more attracted to the idea of directing a film myself. One thing that often pushed me away was the amount of people who work on a film set to make the project come together, I’m quite the control freak and not only do I like to be in charge of everything, but there’s very few people I’d trust to help me and I like learning the extra skills involved.
I did a photo story to be used as my portfolio to get into college to study photography, and the issues in the story which the shoot addresses is one which I strongly believe in and really want to get out there and have it gather more attention. I’ve decided to take the plunge into the world of filmmaking in an effort to get this story out there and hopefully have these issues addressed by more people. So, a few weeks I started piecing together a script and developing my idea to suit the different medium. But the best thing is, my portfolio pretty much acts as a visual shooting guide/basic storyboard.

DSCF3483Instagram photo from Stuart Comerford

It’s been rather difficult to contain the world I’ve created in the script, it’s hard to not let other storylines drift into the spotlight. I’m trying to replicate a real world environment and keep it as realistic as possible without going too over-the-top and I’m finding it rather difficult but the script is coming together and is practically done, all other tweaks would be done during filming.
As I’m in the middle of my Leaving Cert exams I can’t start it quite yet, but at the end of this month the production will be in full swing! Hopefully everything will be wrapped up and released by August (actually, it needs to be into post-production at least by August since my leading male is moving to England in the first week of August!). I’m really excited to make this.

The film is a documentation of the frequently avoided subject of teenage depression, following the story of one teenage girl as she deals with bullying, social exclusion, isolation, and domestic violence during a pivotal time in her life when she’s finishing school and concerned about the purpose of her existence. Not everybody “fits in” as a teenager due to it being such a crucial period of personal development and self-discovery, and I hope to create something that at least opens people’s eyes to a topic which is very serious and demands attention.

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Is gear important?

For making good photos? No. Unless you count your mind/eyes as pieces of gear (I do have to include my brain on a checklist of gear to bring with me for shoots as I frequently find myself making stupid, brainless decisions).

If you want to take good landscapes, portraits, street shots etc. – you can do that with anything. About 90% of photography doesn’t have any sort of gear restrictions, of course better gear can improve things but you can still create magnificent photos with anything that takes a picture. I love using Instagram for example, my phone is the one camera that I have on me all of the time so I’m always taking some photos on it and popping the best ones on my instagram. You see many people on Instagram taking brilliant photos with their phones (not everyone, but there are some great photographers on there). There’s always been a huge cult-like hatred for Instagram but regardless of the means used to take/create the photo, surely if it’s a well taken photo – it’s a well taken photo?

But depending on your chosen field of photography, gear can be of the utmost importance. Sports photography is extremely difficult to do well at with minimal gear. It can be done, you can get some good photos, but to replicate the best you need to have the best gear available – there’s no real way around it. Long lenses, fast bodies, rugged equipment. Then for wedding and music photography you need to have gear that can cope with extremely dark situations – fast aperture lenses and high ISO capable cameras don’t exactly come cheap.

There’s something that I’ve learned over the past year which has really shocked me. “Looking the part” seems to be quite important when it comes to getting hired. Flash a white lens here or there, and you’ll have people whispering “oh, he’s a professional”. Getting people to move out of your way is much easier when you have a big camera and lens. Not very many people took me seriously when I was at a stage where I had minimal gear, only when that started growing to more lenses, bigger gear, bigger bags did I start getting respect for what I did. I can still remember the very first time I brought two lenses on a shoot with me – I was photographing a band’s recording session and I could feel the atmosphere in the room get more serious as I took out the other lens. Now, it was only a 55-250mm lens for my Canon 500D (the day that shoot was done was my 16th birthday, I got that lens as a present from my Mam that morning, the only other lens I had was my kit lens), nothing majorly impressive about the lens but I felt like I was in charge, which was a first.

I say it a lot, but it’s true that we live in a society where nearly everyone considers themselves photographers (thanks a lot, hipster culture) so people naturally look for ways to distinguish the big dogs from the rest of the bunch. Sometimes flashing some fancy looking equipment is the easiest way to stand out – it’s quite a dirty tactic, especially if you then go and produce terrible images, in turn damaging the reputation of professional photography. Looking and acting the part will open doors, your ability will dictate whether or not those doors get slammed shut in your face. I sometimes wear my business card on a lanyard around my neck for 2 purposes, having my contact information easily accessible and showing that I’m a photographer, this is my job.

Go look on 500px and you’ll see that there is a plethora of unbelievable photos that are taken with near ancient equipment. If you want to take great photos then just go outside and start taking pictures with whatever camera you have, practice makes perfect. But unfortunately, in a culture where first impressions mean a lot, looking the part is the easiest way to break into the field. But don’t let that hold you back, I’m still chugging along, building my gear as I go and pushing to get media passes, great photos, and respect for what I do.

 

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Portrait of a Place, Volume 1

A few of my friends and I went down to a local chipper for lunch the other day when we had a bunch of free classes in school. Afterwards we were walking around the park next to the chipper and came across this really old, deserted playground. A new wooden playground had been build just beside it and this one was now obsolete. It was in bits, graffiti, rubbish, safety hazards… it was a broken down wreck. I felt that the place had quite a bit of character and after talking about it for a minute or two one of my friends convinced me that it would be a great place to do a photoshoot. So I took out my phone and took a few shots to get a feel for what the place was like and add it to my locations archive. However, I liked what I was seeing a took a few more with the intention of making a series which dealt with the character of the place. I’m calling this series “Portrait of a Place” and I plan to do it for a few things, hopefully the next will be done in a more planned manner!

Here are the photos, taken with a HTC One V phone camera and the JPEG (yuck!) shots were edited in Lightroom 4.

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I post some similar pictures like this on my Instagram which can be found here if you’re interested: http://instagram.com/stuartcomerford